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Articles by Jonathan D. Glater

THE NEW YORK TIMES
October 17, 2008
In difficult dinner-table conversations, college students and their parents are revisiting how to pay tuition as their personal finances weaken and lenders get tough.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
February 22, 2008
Stanford University on Wednesday became the latest prominent university to expand financial aid well into the middle class. It announced that students from families earning less than $100,000 a year would not be charged tuition.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
November 13, 2007
Soaring compensation of university presidents, once limited to a few wealthy institutions, is becoming increasingly common, with the number of million-dollar pay packages at private institutions nearly doubling last year, and compensation at many public universities not far behind.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
October 23, 2007
Tuition and fees at public and private colleges and universities rose at more than double the rate of inflation, the College Board said in reports released Monday morning.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
August 29, 2007
The College Board, the powerful testing organization known for its SAT and Advanced Placement exams, announced on Wednesday, Aug. 22 that it was getting out of the student loan business.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
April 13, 2007
Sallie Mae, the nation's largest lender to college students, agreed Wednesday to pay $2 million to settle an investigation by the New York attorney general's office and said it would close down student call centers it has run for college financial aid offices.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
April 10, 2007
The founders of Student Loan Xpress had an explicit plan for corralling a bigger share of the lucrative student loan business: "market to the financial aid offices of schools."
THE NEW YORK TIMES
March 23, 2007
Andrew M. Cuomo, New York's attorney general, announced Thursday that he planned to bring a civil lawsuit against a student lending company for deceptive business practices, accusing it of paying colleges and universities to steer student borrowers toward its loans.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
March 16, 2007
Lawmakers from both parties are pressuring the Education Department to explain why it let a student loan company keep $278 million in subsidies that an audit found improper.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
February 6, 2007
Colleges and universities from Massachusetts to California began receiving formal requests for information Feb. 2 from the New York attorney general’s office as part of an investigation of financial relationships they or individual college officials have with student loan companies.
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