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Eddie Ha
(Right to left) Youngsoo Jang ’15, Ingwon Chae ’14, and Richard C. Yoon ’13 take a break during filming.
Elijah Mena—The Tech
(Right to left) Ingwon Chae ’14, Richard C. Yoon ’13, and Eddie Ha ’13, producer, star, and director, respectively, of the hit MIT Gangnam Style video, pose for a photoshoot at The Tech.
Eddie Ha
Ingwon Chae ’14 poses with his horse head mask.
Illustration by Aislyn SchalCk—The Tech
Joanna kao—The Tech
Anji Ren
Richard C. Yoon ’13 is filmed in the Main Group.
Eddie Ha
Richard Yoon stands in Killian Court before the flashmob on Oct. 21.
Frank Zhu
MIT Women’s Soccer is filmed for the “Gangnam Style” video.
Emily Kellison-Linn—The Tech
Erik A. Waingarten ’15 and interviewer Joseph Falvella of Chrysler read interview tips posted on the wall of the MIT Global Education & Career Development Office while waiting for their appointments. GECD provides 22 interview cubicles that employers can rent to conduct on-campus job interviews with students.
David J. Bermejo—The Tech
Day 5, Oct. 20. Morning clouds roll over the demolition site.
David J. Bermejo—The Tech
Day 1, Oct. 16. Photographs of 219 Vassar St. were taken over a week and a half period to showcase the gradual changes that took place during its demolition.
David J. Bermejo—The Tech
Day 2, Oct. 17. This photo highlights the range of an HDR image. By combining three different exposures into a single image, all levels of detail, from the brightness of the setting sun and to the shadows inside the demolished building, were retained.
David J. Bermejo—The Tech
Day 11, Oct. 26. Previously a place of much noise and destruction, the demolition site was cleared and quiet on the evening of the last day.
David J. Bermejo—The Tech
219 Vassar St. lies halfway demolished at the end of October. This photograph, as well as the others in the photo essay on page 7, were created by merging at least two photographs of different exposure levels into a single image in a process called high dynamic range (HDR) imaging. When done subtly, the resulting image oftentimes more closely resembles human visual perception than a regular, single-exposure photograph.
David J. Bermejo—The Tech
Day 9, Oct. 24. By the eighth day, most of the building had been demolished.