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The Grand Junction Railroad may become a commuter rail link between Boston’s North Station and Worcester. The Massachusetts Department of Transportation has purchased the rights to the rail line, which runs past Simmons Hall and over Massachusetts Avenue, and is investigating the possibility of upgrading the tracks for commuter rail use. If realized, a commuter rail line along Grand Junction could mean that as many as 25 trains per day will travel the tracks, a marked increase over the light freight use it experiences today. The Cambridge City Council has come out against commuter rail, citing a potential impact on already-congested Cambridge streets, noise pollution, and the lack of any apparent benefits of commuter rail for Cambridge communities. MassDOT says that linking Worcester and North Station will strengthen the regional economy. The tracks run directly under Building 46, MIT’s Brain and Cognitive Sciences complex.
Jaswanth Madhavan
The Grand Junction Railroad may become a commuter rail link between Boston’s North Station and Worcester. The Massachusetts Department of Transportation has purchased the rights to the rail line, which runs past Simmons Hall and over Massachusetts Avenue, and is investigating the possibility of upgrading the tracks for commuter rail use. If realized, a commuter rail line along Grand Junction could mean that as many as 25 trains per day will travel the tracks, a marked increase over the light freight use it experiences today. The Cambridge City Council has come out against commuter rail, citing a potential impact on already-congested Cambridge streets, noise pollution, and the lack of any apparent benefits of commuter rail for Cambridge communities. MassDOT says that linking Worcester and North Station will strengthen the regional economy. The tracks run directly under Building 46, MIT’s Brain and Cognitive Sciences complex.