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Meng Heng Touch—The Tech
Kenneth Oye, Associate Professor of Political Science and Engineering Systems Design, comments on the chain of events occurring in Japan and his view of the reaction of the Japanese people and government. He credited the strict Japanese building code with helping Tokyo survive the earthquake. Oye also praised the calmness of the Japanese people during the disaster and their sense of duty to help others in need, but said their response contrasted with the Japanese government’s disorder in handling the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima power plant. Professor Oye was in Japan last week when the disasters occurred.
Situation for Noon Eastern Time, Friday, March 18, 2011
Source: MIT Fact Or Fiction, http://factorfiction.mit.edu
The Fact or Fiction awareness campaign uses posters to challenge MIT undergraduate women to question the influences on their female identity. However, many students found some of these posters confusing.
Quentin Smith—The Tech
Darth Maul from Star Wars shows up at the convention to promote The Old Republic, an upcoming MMO.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
A cosplayer dresses up as Sarah Kerrigan from Starcraft.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
The Tech’s Jessica J. Pourian ’13 interviews “Thorkon,” the creator of a case mod who is dressed as Boo.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
A female cosplayer dressed as Yuna from Final Fantasy X poses for a photo.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
Some of the best arcade game players in the world try to set records at PAX East.
Courtesy of DigitalGlobe
The nuclear reactors in Fukushima, Japan, were damaged by last Friday’s tsunami and earthquake. The outer containment buildings of Units 1 and 3 exploded due to a buildup of hydrogen gas after the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and resulting tsunami hit. Suppression tanks at Unit 2 were damaged in an additional hydrogen explosion. The Japanese Association of MIT, the MIT Figure Skating Club, and other student groups are raising money for victims of the disaster. Aftershocks from the earthquake continue to be felt in Japan.
Courtesy of DigitalGlobe
Sendai port, 60 miles from Fukushima, was devastated by the disaster.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
A case mod of Divx, a character in Penny Arcade, was featured holding a bottle of Wild Turkey.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
A Metroid fan dressed as Samus Aran plays Rockband with other attendees. There were several Rockband stations set up around the PAX East convention.
courtesy of Fueled by Ramen
Travie McCoy of Gym Class Heroes fame debuted his solo album, Lazarus, last year.
Courtesy of Google and GeoEye
Kesennuma, home to more than 70,000, after the tsunami.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
A fan plays Duckhunt in the classics video game room at PAX East.
Steve Howland—The Tech
Members of the MIT Figure Skating Club perform a themed routine based on The Charlie Daniel’s Band’s song “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” during an event on March 17 to raise money for victims of the recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Individuals and groups from MIT and the Boston area performed a number of routines before the rink was opened for free skate. Donations and messages were collected, and proceeds from skate rentals also went toward disaster relief.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
An attendee plays Dance Central, a Kinect game by Harmonix.
Greg Steinbrecher—The Tech
Tabletop gamers filled an exhibition hall during last weekend’s Penny Arcade Expo. Games ranged from Katamari Damacy to Jenga.
Patricia E. Gercik
The earthquake and subsequent tsunami caused a major food shortage in Japan.
Jeremy E. deGuzman
The west parallel of East Campus flooded early Tuesday afternoon due to the installation of a fire hydrant. Workers took most of the day to stop the flood.
Arfa Aijazi—The Tech
Kuljot S. Anand ’13 sings “Just Dance Pe Chance,” an original mashup of Lady Gaga’s “Just Dance” and “Dance Pe Chance” from the Bollywood movie Rab Ne Bana Di Jodi, at the MIT Ohms debut concert Friday night. The newly founded Ohms is MIT’s only South Asian a capella group and combines American pop songs with the best of Bollywood.
Christian J. Ternus—the tech
Grace M. Kane ’11 (Romeo) and Allison M. Schneider ’13 (Mercutio) star in the MIT Shakespeare Ensemble’s production of Romeo and Juliet.