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Charles Lin—The Tech
Peter Holmström’s Birthday on tour...he definitely lit up like a cake.
Our index used: -2: “Very Conservative” -1: “Conservative” 0: “Moderate” 1: “Liberal” 2: “Very Liberal”
Our index used: -2: “Very Conservative” -1: “Conservative” 0: “Moderate” 1: “Liberal” 2: “Very Liberal”
Charles Lin—The Tech
We’ve been stoned on tour for the last 17 years.
Our index used: -2: “Very Conservative” -1: “Conservative” 0: “Moderate” 1: “Liberal” 2: “Very Liberal”
Micaela Pilotto, Roman Stocker and Pedro Reis
By studying MIT Associate Professor Roman Stocker’s cat, Cutta Cutta, Researchers at MIT, Virginia Tech, and Princeton have found that when cats lap, only the top surface of their tongue touches the liquid. Domestic cats lap about four times per second, and each lap brings in 0.1 milliliters of liquid.
Elizabeth D’Arienzo—The Tech
Douglas Witte shows some children the art of playing the organ at the MIT Chapel after the organ recital on Veteran’s Day. Helen Ward Mannix and Witte both performed, playing pieces such as “Four Versets and a Canzona” by James Woodman and “Fugue in F major” by J. S. Bach.
Melissa Renée Schumacher—The Tech
The new David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research is seen on Thursday. Construction on the building is nearly finished, and labs will begin moving in soon.
Arfa Aijazi—The Tech
The MIT iGEM team opens the floor for questions after their presentation on Sunday.
iGEM, or the International Genetically Engineered Machine competition, is a five-month-long research challenge, which culminated with a jamboree at MIT this past weekend.
For their work, the MIT team received the award for Best Manufacturing Project.
The MIT project had two parts: One part used ultraviolet light to induce bacteriophage production and polymerization, forming a 3D photo using the phage. The other part used pressure to induce mammalian stem cells to differentiate into bone cells.
Awards are given in eight tracks, and the winners of the tracks are considered finalists for the grand prize, the BioBrick Trophy. MIT won its track, but not the grand prize, which went to the team from Slovenia for their work on using DNA-binding regions of proteins to gather together many proteins that are involved in the same biosynthetic pathway.
The MIT team consisted of 13 undergraduates, 10 instructors, and 4 faculty advisors.
To learn more about their project, visit http://2010.igem.org/Team:MIT
Paolo Aguilar—EPA