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Pablo Bello ’11, Edward Grinnel ’11, Elvine Pineda ’11, and Arielle Fischer ’11 placed 2nd, 1st, 3rd, and 4th, respectively, in this year’s 2.007 competition.
The 2.007 game, “Sweepin’ the Nation,” consists of three main tasks — robots could crush soda cans, place crushed or pre-crushed soda cans in a “storage slot,” and stack bales of “trash” to obtain points. Robots start out in the starting box on their side of the field and can traverse to their opponent’s side via a rotating passage pipe.
Students received a large tote containing different materials — metals, plastics, wheels, etc — to construct their robots. Students had the option of building two robots, one for mainly scoring and one robot to bother the opponents; however, some students chose to build one large robot. Students also had the option of having one or two drivers to control the many mechanisms of their robot.
Matches consisted of an autonomous period, a 10 second period where robots were operated by just their sensors, followed by a 50-second operator-controlled period. Strategies of students varied, with some robots taking advantage of the autonomous period to position themselves and others just staying put in their starting box. Designs of robots to perform the various tasks also varied, and many robots in the final matches were only able to perform one or two of the possible ways to score.
The top four contestants of the contest can attend an international design competition in Tokyo, Japan this summer.
Pablo Bello ’11, Edward Grinnel ’11, Elvine Pineda ’11, and Arielle Fischer ’11 placed 2nd, 1st, 3rd, and 4th, respectively, in this year’s 2.007 competition.
The 2.007 game, “Sweepin’ the Nation,” consists of three main tasks — robots could crush soda cans, place crushed or pre-crushed soda cans in a “storage slot,” and stack bales of “trash” to obtain points. Robots start out in the starting box on their side of the field and can traverse to their opponent’s side via a rotating passage pipe.
Students received a large tote containing different materials — metals, plastics, wheels, etc — to construct their robots. Students had the option of building two robots, one for mainly scoring and one robot to bother the opponents; however, some students chose to build one large robot. Students also had the option of having one or two drivers to control the many mechanisms of their robot.
Matches consisted of an autonomous period, a 10 second period where robots were operated by just their sensors, followed by a 50-second operator-controlled period. Strategies of students varied, with some robots taking advantage of the autonomous period to position themselves and others just staying put in their starting box. Designs of robots to perform the various tasks also varied, and many robots in the final matches were only able to perform one or two of the possible ways to score.
The top four contestants of the contest can attend an international design competition in Tokyo, Japan this summer.