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Christina Kang—The Tech
Women and children spend the daylight hours in the small alleyways between their one-room homes outside of Delhi, India.
Eric D. Schmiedl—Tech File Photo
MIT Police Chief John DiFava has been promoted to the head of the Operations and Security division of the Department of Facilities. Facilities was split into two divisions, which also includes Capital Projects and Strategic Planning, on Nov. 5.
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The Logitech NuLOOQ Navigator.
Christina Kang—The Tech
A community member in the camps outside Delhi, India prepares food in a small room.
Christina Kang—The Tech
Two teenage boys play a board game in the alleyway between their homes outside of Delhi, India.
Andrea Robles—The Tech
Monica F. Kahn ’10 (Marijuana) is the voice of reason of the play with random burst of deep thoughts, among all the nonsense. “Vice Play,” written by Sally E. Peach ’09 and directed by Danbee Kim ’09 (also a Tech cartoonist) chronicles four common vices — nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, and marijuana — as they attempt to get a deeper understanding of their individual worlds. The MIT Dramashop presented four One Acts in early November.
Omari Stephens—The TEch
Arin S. Rogers ’11 glances up during Duke Ellington’s “In a Sentimental Mood,” as arranged by Herb Pomeroy. The song was the first of a two-part medley in memory of Pomeroy, who passed away this year. The MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble performed a concert on Saturday, Nov. 17, titled “Celebrating Boston Jazz & the Music of Charlie Kohlhase.”
Martha Angela Wilcox
Koyel Bhattacharyya ’09, Elizabeth E. Turner ’10, and Amudha Panneerselvam ’10 sing “Lady Marmalade,” originally performed by Labelle, at Saturday’s Resonance concert in 10-250.
Omari Stephens—The TEch
Matthew J. Rosario ’10 plays the electric piano during “In a Sentimental Mood.” The MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble performed a concert on Saturday, Nov. 17, titled “Celebrating Boston Jazz & the Music of Charlie Kohlhase.”
Omari Stephens—The TEch
Geoffrey Sheil ’09 (left) plays the guitar alongside Kohlhase (right) in “Buhaina Checked Out,” a song that Kohlhase composed in memory of jazz drummer Art Blakey (also known as Abdullah Ibn Buhaina). The MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble performed a concert on Saturday, Nov. 17, titled “Celebrating Boston Jazz & the Music of Charlie Kohlhase.”
Omari Stephens—The Tech
Lindley C. Graham ’10 (right) jumps back as her opponent charges during a foil fencing bout. The men’s and women’s fencing teams travelled to Boston University this past Saturday, Nov. 17 to compete in a Northeast Fencing Conference tournament.
Omari Stephens—The TEch
Director Frederick E. Harris Jr. (center, rear) looks on as the Ensemble performs Kholhase’s “Jasper Jaguar/Deceptor.” The MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble performed a concert on Saturday, Nov. 17, titled “Celebrating Boston Jazz & the Music of Charlie Kohlhase.”
Omari Stephens—The Tech
(Left to right) Sinan Keten G, Matthew J. Rosario ’10, Jack Murphy ’10, and Jason Rich G play the closing piece of the concert, Eero Koivistoinen’s “Kukonpesä.” The MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble performed a concert on Saturday, Nov. 17, titled “Celebrating Boston Jazz & the Music of Charlie Kohlhase.”
Omari Stephens—The TEch
Director Frederick E. Harris Jr. hops during a crescendo near the end of “Somethin’ Sassy,” by Hal Crook. The MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble performed a concert on Saturday, Nov. 17, titled “Celebrating Boston Jazz & the Music of Charlie Kohlhase.”
Omari Stephens—The Tech
Javier J. Ordonez ’10 (left) begins an attack against his Boston University opponent during an épée bout. The men’s and women’s fencing teams travelled to BU this past Saturday, Nov. 17, to compete in a Northeast Fencing Conference tournament.