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Film Review: A Moment With Wongfu Productions

Amateur Group Screens Their First Movie, ...A Moment With You...

By Tina Ro
STAFF WRITER

A Moment With You

Wongfu Productions

Written, Directed, and Produced by

Wesley Chan, Ted Fu, and Philip Wong

Thursday, Nov. 16, 2006

54-100

www.wongfuproductions.com

On Thursday, Nov. 16, MIT’s Chinese Students Club sponsored a screening of “A Moment With You,” by the amateur group Wongfu Productions. Although the large crowd was primarily composed of Asian students, the movie itself is not targeted toward a specific audience. The movie screening was open to the entire MIT community and ended with an opportunity for the audience to ask the three gentlemen of Wongfu Productions questions.

Wongfu Productions is really Wesley Chan, Ted Fu, and Philip Wong. The three men started off as freshman roommates at the University of California, San Diego, and went on to create their own filming company: Sketchbook Media. Prior to this movie, they made music videos and other short films — all of which can be found on YouTube.

In their senior year at UCSD, the three decided to create a full-length feature film. After working for eight months on the film, while also finishing their schoolwork, they created an hour and forty minutes worth of film.

The film’s storyline centers on two contrasting characters, Dustin and Arthur, who come from different backgrounds, and are shaped by very different experiences, yet come to learn the same life lessons.

Arthur is the classic, stereotypical dork who has never had a girlfriend; a girl finally comes into his life, yet Arthur refuses to acknowledge her and take advantage of this opportunity.

Dustin does not have a problem finding women. However, the only girl he thinks of is his ex-girlfriend. He cannot let go of this relationship from years ago. The theme focuses on the importance of certain moments that shape the lives of individuals and the importance of making the most of present opportunities. The dialogue is reminiscent of that between Joey and Dawson in the old teen drama Dawson’s Creek, but with more sophistication.

The movie fits the genre of romantic comedy with less emphasis on the comedy and more on serious life themes. However, many scenes and romantic moments in the movie are “aww” provoking and surprisingly simple. Chan, Fu, and Wong explained that simplicity was key: these events could have been experienced by anyone.

Despite its large Asian fan base, Wongfu’s movie has a cast of equal numbers of Asians and Caucasians. Furthermore, all the characters were shaped by their own characteristics rather than by their race, a refreshing concept for a movie.

After the showing, the audience enthusiastically clapped and cheered. The three movie-makers then answered questions from the audience ranging from how the set was made to whether or not they were single. (Their set was a friend’s apartment, and two of the three are single, though they did not provide phone numbers).

“A Moment With You” will be publicly available next spring; for updates see www.wongfuproductions.com. A trailer for “A Moment With You,” can be found on the movie web site www.amomentwithyou.com.