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Timeline of Events Relevant to Shin Lawsuit

Timeline of Events Relevant to Shin Lawsuit

Sept. 1998 Shin enrolls at MIT.
Feb. 1999 Shin overdoses of Tylenol with codeine and spends one week under psychiatric care at McLean Hospital. Shin tells doctors she had mental health problems in high school. With Shin’s consent, Random Hall Housemaster Nina Davis-Millis contacts Shin’s parents, and they agree that Shin will meet with Dr. Kristine A. Girard at MIT Mental Health Services every few weeks.
Oct. 6, 1999 Shin tells Ayida S. Mthembu, an associate dean of Counseling and Support Services (CSS) at the time, that she was considering suicide. Mthembu immediately sends Shin to MIT Mental Health, where an MIT Medical psychiatrist notes Shin has been cutting herself, without suicidal intent. The psychiatrist advises Shin to return in one or two days.
Oct. 12, 1999 Girard meets with Shin, and notes that Shin said she was “feeling significantly better.”
Nov. 9, 1999 Shin meets with Arnold R. Henderson, an associate dean of CSS at the time, and tells him she is cutting herself again. Henderson arranges for her to see MIT psychiatrists immediately.
Dec. 6, 1999 Henderson learns that Elizabeth had told a teaching assistant that she had brought sleeping pills with the intention to take them but did not; he reports the incident to Davis-Millis and Girard.
Mar. 18, 2000 A student tells Davis-Millis that Elizabeth is cutting herself and upset. Shin goes to MIT Mental Health, where she stays for a day and a physician prescribes a tranquilizer for her to take.
Mar. 20, 2000 With Shin’s consent, Davis-Millis contacts Shin’s parents, and Shin’s father takes her home to New Jersey the next day.
Mar. 23, 2000 Elizabeth begins treatment with a new psychologist, Dr. Linda Cunningham, who diagnoses her with a borderline personality disorder and depression.
Mar. 29, 2000 Henderson speaks to professors about postponing Shin’s exams for the next week.
Mar. 30, 2000 Shin meets with Cunningham, who says that Shin’s depressive episode is severe and increases Shin’s medication dosage.
End of March 2000
– Apr. 10, 2000
Davis-Millis receives frequent reports from Random Hall students and graduate resident tutors that Shin is not well.
April 4, 2000 Shin meets with Dr. Lili Gottfried during a walk-in appointment at MIT Mental Health.
April 6, 2000 Shin meets with Dr. Cunningham, who raises the possibility of hospitalization and tells Shin to return later that day.
April 6, 2000 A professor contacts Henderson about cuts on Shin’s arms; Henderson replies that Shin is being taken care of.
April 8, 2000 Shin tells a student she plans to commit suicide; the student calls the MIT Police, and Shin is taken to MIT Medical. On-call psychiatrist Anthony Van Niel speaks with Shin on the phone for under five minutes, determines Shin is not “acutely suicidal,” and allows her to go home without instructions for follow-up.
12:30 a.m.,
April 10, 2000
Two Random Hall students notify Davis-Millis that Shin had told them of plans to kill herself later that day. Davis-Millis informs Van Niel and Henderson and talks with Shin, who says something to the effect of “you won’t have to worry about me any more.”
11 a.m.
April 10, 2000
At a “deans and psychs meeting,” Henderson, Girard, Gottfried, Dr. Peter Reich and others discuss Shin’s case. Reich makes an appointment at an outside hospital for Shin the next day, leaving her a phone message.
9 p.m.
April 10, 2000
The smoke alarm goes off at Random Hall. Shin is found to have suffered third degree burns on over 65 percent of her body.
April 14, 2000 Shin’s parents are told their daughter has irreversible neurological brain damage; at 1:50 a.m. doctors pronounce Shin dead.
April 18, 2000 A medical examiner determines the cause of death to be “self-inflicted thermal burns,” in agreement with Reich and MIT Chief of Police Anne P. Glavin.
Jan. 28, 2002 Shin’s parents file a wrongful death civil lawsuit against MIT and employees, claiming damages of $27.65 million.
March 8–11, 2002 Defendants submit responses to the lawsuit denying wrongdoing.
April–May 2002 Defendants request and are granted medical records from Massachusetts General Hospital, the medical examiner’s, and McLean Hospital.
Aug. 27, 2002 A medical malpractice tribunal rules that there is sufficient evidence to raise questions of liability for the medical malpractice charges to proceed.
Mar 24, 2004 The judge orders the Shins to provide the defendants with their daughter’s computer and personal digital assistant.
Jan. 20, 2005 MIT and administrators Davis-Millis and Henderson file motions for summary judgment on all counts.
Jan. 31, 2005 Girard files a motion for summary judgment on all counts.
Feb. 1, 2005 Cunningham, Van Niel, and Reich file a motion for summary judgment on three of the counts against them. Girard joins the motion.
June 27, 2005 Judge Christine McEvoy rules on the motions for summary judgment, dismissing all charges against MIT and some charges against administrators and MIT Medical doctors.
July 14, 2005 Charges against MIT Police officers are dismissed with agreement of the Shins.
Ongoing Shins will soon file paperwork dropping the counts against Gottfried and Mthembu.
Sept. 21, 2005 Final pre-trial conference will occur.

source: Memorandum of Decision and Order of Defendants’ motions for summary judgemenT, AND CASE DOCKET