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CIA Chief Seeks Change in Inspector’s 9/11 Report


The director of central intelligence has asked the CIA’s inspector general to modify a draft report on the Sept. 11 attacks to avoid drawing conclusions about whether individual CIA officers should be held accountable for any failures, congressional and intelligence officials said on Monday.

The request by Porter J. Goss, the intelligence chief, would affect an 800-page report that is the result of nearly two years of work. Congressional officials said they were reviewing Goss’ request, spelled out in an Oct. 27 memorandum to the inspector general, John Helgerson, to determine whether it is consistent with a request by the joint congressional committee that looked into the Sept. 11 attacks.

That panel asked in December 2002 that the CIA’s inspector general determine “whether and to what extent personnel at all levels should be held accountable” for any mistakes that contributed to the failure to disrupt the attacks. Helgerson’s draft report is widely understood to identify individual officers and officials who should be considered for discipline because of breakdowns in the collection, analysis and distribution of intelligence before the Sept. 11 attacks.

That panel asked in December 2002 that the CIA’s inspector general determine “whether and to what extent personnel at all levels should be held accountable” for any mistakes that contributed to the failure to disrupt the attacks. Helgerson’s draft report is widely understood to identify individual officers and officials who should be considered for discipline because of breakdowns in the collection, analysis and distribution of intelligence before the Sept. 11 attacks.

Cervical Cancer Vaccine Effective


An experimental vaccine to prevent cervical cancer, first proved effective in preliminary testing two years ago, has continued to provide protection against the disease, researchers reported Monday.

The vaccine, which works by making people immune to a common sexually transmitted virus that causes the cancer, is not yet available. But its maker, Merck Laboratories, expects to apply for approval late next year, said Dr. Eliav Barr, a research director at the company.

Worldwide, there are 470,000 new cases of cervical cancer a year and 225,000 deaths. Most of the deaths occur in poorer countries where women do not have regular Pap tests, which can detect cancers or precancers early enough for them to be cured. In the United States, where Pap testing is widespread, 11,000 new cases are expected this year and about 4,000 deaths.

If the vaccine is approved, Barr said, it will be recommended for use in young adults and in children starting at age 9 or 10, before they become sexually active and encounter the virus. Once cancer develops, it is too late for the vaccine to help. The median age at which young people in the United States first have sex is 15.

Boys as well as girls should be vaccinated, researchers say.

Men are not usually harmed by the virus, but they carry it and infect women, so immunizing men will protect women. It will also protect men who have sex with men, a group with rising rates of anal cancer caused by the same viruses that cause cervical cancer.