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Ask Arista

Ask Arista is a humorous advice column written anonymously by an MIT student. The identities of all parties are private.

Dear Arista,

In this modern, equal society, should a guy still pay for a girl on a date?

--Penniless Playboy

Dear Penniless,

Wait, society is equal? Though I’d love to argue with you on this, it is entirely beside the point. If you feel uncomfortable or unwilling to pay for your date, then don’t. It will send her a clear message that you view her as a powerful, respected equal with as much ability to provide financial security as yourself. Plus, it will give the real gentlemen of the world an advantage in wooing the most desirable women for themselves.

Seriously, why wouldn’t you want to pay for your date? Most guys on dates are out to impress the person they’re with, and believe me, picking up the check will almost certainly win you points here. Girls want to be respected, true, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be chivalrous. If your wallet is hurting from all your gallantry, try some low-budget dating activities.

A long, moonlit walk along the river is free, and quite effective, judging from all the public displays of affection one sees on the shores of the Chuck. Cook and serve her a candlelit dinner for two, hang out with microwave popcorn and a movie, or give her a massage. Obviously, some of these suggestions work better once you’ve gotten to know the person, but let her and your preferences be your guide. At the very least, she will appreciate your thoughtfulness.

Good luck,

--Arista K.

Dear Arista,

Do you know any good pick up lines?

--Ray and Silent Slob

Dear R.S.S.,

Yeah. “Here, let me get that for you.”

Peace,

--Arista K.

Dear Arista,

I’m writing up my resume now, in the hopes of getting a summer internship. How can I make my previous experiences sound impressive to employers?

--Jobless Junior

Dear Jobless,

Resume-writing is an art. Like all artists, you must approach the task with the correct mindset. First, no matter how badly MIT may have beaten your ego to a pulp, you must present yourself as though you consider yourself as competent, nay, as brilliant, as any other job applicant, if not more so. If you write your resume with confidence, it will show through in the printed word, grab the recruiter by the shirt collar, and say, “Hire me, I’m spectacular!” If you use the right action verbs, it may even wipe the spittle off the recruiter’s glasses after doing so.

I’m not saying you should be an egomaniac, but I think MIT students, on the whole, are a humble bunch who tend to undersell themselves. Be aggressive, yet friendly, and emphasize your strengths. Look at sample resumes for ideas on wording. Both the MIT Career Center and Jobtrak have online resources to help people write their resumes. If you want to hear from people whose opinions actually count, MIT is having an Employer Resume Critique Week next week, Oct. 28 to Nov. 1. Information can be found online at <http://web.mit.edu/career/www/Ercw.htm>. Happy hunting!

Signing out,

--Arista K.

Do you have a question you’re dying to ask Arista? E-mail your question to <AristaK@mit.edu>, and it could appear in the next installment of “Ask Arista!”