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FOOD REVIEW

The Essential Vegetarian

Everyday Is Earth Day

By Katie Jeffreys

Staff Writer

Earth Week is upon us again. Earth Week started Monday and will culminate with Earth Day on Sunday. There are several events going on at MIT and around Boston that you can participate in to show your support for environmental issues and to learn something new.

The MIT environmental group, SAVE, has been handing out plants and information at a booth on the Student Center steps. There is also a booth in Lobby 10 showing what the Environmental Programs Task Force has done to make our campus more environmentally friendly. Most noticeably they have put those nice blue and green recycling bins around.

On Saturday, Apr 21, members of SAVE will be meeting at 10 a.m. at the student center steps to go clean up the Charles River. Feel free to join them as they climb into boats and get all the nastiness out of the river with nets. Plus you get a free t-shirt and some food.

On EarthFest, to be held on Saturday, April 28, rides on the T (both trains and buses) will be free before 7:30 p.m. Or take a stroll over to the Esplanade where there will be a free concert. If you can’t find anyone to go with you, join up with the SAVE kids at noon at the student center steps to enjoy the day. For more events, check <http://www.earthdayonline.org/2001/calendar.html>.

If you don’t have time to actually go out and do anything, you can make small changes in your daily life that benefit the environment. I have been preaching for years now about how good a veggie diet is for the environment. But you can do more than simply avoiding meat. For example, eating locally grown produce is more environmentally friendly because less fossil fuel is burned in transporting it. You can also do all those commonly promoted things like wearing a sweater instead of turning up the heat or turning off lights and appliances when you leave the room.

Also, as I will be graduating in June, I have been asked to look for a replacement. If you are interested in writing a column about vegetarian food and issues, please contact me. And as always, feel free to contact me with any questions or comments at <veggie@the-tech.mit.edu>.

This week’s recipe is a good dish to bring along on a picnic, so why not go out and enjoy spring on the Esplanade.

Bow Tie Pasta with Carrots, Artichokes, and Pistachios

3 large carrots

2 7 1/2 ounce jars water packed artichoke hearts

3/4 cup shelled whole pistachios

4 tablespoons olive oil

1 large red onion

6 medium cloves garlic, minced

1/2 teaspoon dried red chili flakes

1/4 cup (firmly packed) Parsley minced

3 tablespoons lemon juice

1/4 cup water

6 ounces feta, crumbled

garnish of lemon wedges

1 pound bow tie pasta

Slice the carrot on the diagonal into 1/8 inch discs. Cut each artichoke heart into eight wedges. Cut the red onion into small wedges that are the same size as the artichoke hearts. Remove as much of the papery pistachio’s skin as you can. Place a single layer of nuts in a heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat and toast stirring frequently until aromatic. Remove from heat immediately, finely chop the nuts and set aside.

Boil several quarts of water to cook the pasta. Heat two tablespoons of olive oil in a large skillet. Add the carrots, onion, garlic and chili flakes and sautÉ over a medium heat about ten minutes, stirring frequently. Add the artichoke hearts and parsley and sautÉ, stirring occasionally, about five minutes longer. Stir in the lemon juice and water and immediately turn off the heat.

Cook the pasta until al dente and drain briefly. In a bowl, toss the hot noodles with the remaining two tablespoons of olive oil, four ounces of the feta cheese, and pistachios. Serve pasta on plates and top with sautÉed vegetables. Garnish with lemon wedges and crumble remaining feta cheese on top.