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Timeline

January

8

Provost Mark S. Wrighton announces that MIT will close the Lowell Institute School, an extension program that has offered evening technical subjects in MITclassrooms since 1903, as part of a review of the Institute's education priorities.

9

The Strategic Housing Planning Committee recommends that Senior House remain an undergraduate dormitory and that Ashdown House, currently a graduate dormitory, be converted for limited undergraduate use. The committee also recommends building a graduate student dormitory near University Park. The announcement sparks an emergency meeting of the Graduate Student Council.

10

MITestablishes the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Visiting Professor Program, meant to help attract minority scholars in science, engineering, and technology.

13

Adrian B. Danieli '97 and Peter H. Tsang '95 face arson complaints at a Third District Court magistrate's hearing. A MacGregor House fire in late November 1994 prompted the Campus Police to file the complaints.

14

William H. Ramsey '51, who directed the Minority Introduction to Engineering and Science program as executive director of engineering special programs, dies at age 67.

27

U.S. Attorney Donald K. Stearns decides not to appeal to a federal court judge's dismissal of the wire fraud case against David M. LaMacchia '95. In 1994, LaMacchia was alleged to have facilitated the illegal copying and worldwide distribution of over $1 million of copyrighted software through a server he ran on an Athena workstation.

February

1

Leo Osgood Jr., associate professor in the Athletic Department, assumes the position of dean of the Office of Minority Education. Osgood is also the head basketball coach and the dean-on-call for the Office of Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs.

Harvard University announces it will cease direct financial support of the ROTC program at the end of the academic year. Harvard had paid MIT about $130,000 each year to allow Harvard students to participate in ROTC at MIT. The program, which discriminates against students on the basis of their sexual orientation, violates Harvard's and MIT's non-discrimination policies.

Martin R. Friedmann MArch '93, a former graduate student in architecture, takes his own life. Friedmann, although he was not enrolled at MIT at the time of his death, worked at the Media Laboratory.

2

No major housing changes will occur soon, said Dean for Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs Arthur C. Smith. The statement softens recommendations made in January by the Strategic Housing Planning Committee, that said no dormitories would be entirely converted from graduate to undergraduate housing or vice versa.

7

Nearly 200 scientists and government officials, including Presidential Science Adviser John H. Gibbons, meet today in the Bartos Theater at the Media Laboratory to discuss the nation's science policy and the government's budget plan, which was submitted to Congress Feb. 6.

10

The Institute's 21st annual celebration of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. takes place; the theme is "The Trumpet of Conscience: Dr. Martin Luther King's Contract with America." The featured speaker is A. Leon Higginbotham Jr., chief judge emeritus of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and Public Service Professor of Jurisprudence at Harvard University.

22

Members of the Physical Plant rescue team and two MIT students are the first on the scene of a fatal state police helicopter crash at the Harvard Yacht Club, directly across Memorial Drive from the Sloan School of Management. All four passengers - two state police troopers and two telephone company technicians - are killed in the crash.

A House of Representatives appropriations subcommittee cuts undergraduate scholarships by $130 million in fiscal year 1995. The measure will affect neither current recipients nor MIT's tuition and self-help rate increases, said Stanley G. Hudson, director of student financial aid.

28

Joseph J. Snyder, a former treasurer of MIT and a life member of the MIT Corporation, dies at age 87. Snyder is credited with having made investments during the 1950s that have helped MIT deal with post-Cold War cuts in federally-funded research.

March

4

The importance of community service in Jewish life is the topic of a discussion sponsored by the newly formed MIT Jewish Service Corps. Rep. Barney Frank (DMass.) and Visiting Associate Professor of the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences Jeremy M. Wolfe are the talk's featured speakers.

9

US News & World Report ranks the Sloan School of Management and the School of Engineering the best in their fields in its annual survey of graduate schools nationwide. Engineering has rated No. 1 for six consecutive years.

11

Institute Professor John M. Deutch '61, at the time serving as deputy secretary of defense, accepts the president's nomination to become director of the CIA. In January he had said, "it would be presumptuous to suggest that I will be involved in the running of any organization whose initials are not DoD."

13

Students disagree on a proposed intermediate grading system at an Undergraduate Association Council open forum. The forum was meant to introduce a report and background on the proposal and to give the Committee on Academic Performance student input.

20

An electrical fire in the Ashdown House lounge forces an evacuation of the graduate dormitory. An electrical component in a fish tank ignited, setting fire to pieces of paper scattered underneath the tank and the wooden frame supporting it. The fish are not injured.

23

In an election marked by unusually high voter turnout, undergraduates choose Carrie R. Muh '96 and Erik S. Balsley '96 to be the next Under- graduate Association president and vice president. An election referendum shows that a large majority of students are opposed to any change in MIT's grading system.

29

The first $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize is awarded to William J. Bolander of General Motors for his work in automotive technology. William R. Hewlett SM '36 and David Packard, founders of the Hewlett-Packard Company, are given lifetime achievement awards. The awards are part of a $6.5 million program at MIT funded by Lemelson.

April

1

A new agreement between the Dormitory Council and the Department of Housing and Food Services early this month keeps Baker House and Next House dining halls open through the term. The plan assures the short-term survival of the dining halls, which face an uncertain future amid continuing revenue losses.

2

This week the Department of Housing and Food Services instructs dormitory desks to stop accepting the MIT Card as collateral for items loaned by the desk. The new policy comes one day after Housing and Food Services Director Lawrence E. Maguire received a report describing security risks of the card system.

The Committee on Academic Performance proposes a three-year intermediate grade experiment this week that allows faculty members to assign internal pluses and minuses to letter grades, but would limit their use to within MIT. Faculty and students are split over the plan.

3

Perry N. Finley '92 dies. His sister, Tiffany J. Finley '97, refuses to comment on the circumstances of his death.

10

Provost Mark S. Wrighton is announced as the next chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., effective July 1. A former head of the Department of Chemistry, Wrighton served as provost for almost five years.

The Undergraduate Association Council previews proposals that will be part of "a completely brand-new UA constitution," according to then UA President-elect Carrie R. Muh '96. By trimming the UA Council, the council hopes to give its members more responsibility, making them more likely to participate and come to meetings.

Cambridge Mayor Kenneth Reeves convenes a subcommittee to convince the Institute to reverse its decision to close the Lowell Institute School, an MIT program that has offered evening technical courses on campus since 1903. The committee was formed after about 15 people approached the council saying that they had benefitted from Lowell.

11

The team consisting of Henry L. Cohn '95, Adam W. Meyerson '97, and Thomas Weston '96 places third in this year's annual William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition, administered last December. Ruth Britto-Pacumio '96 also reaps honors by winning the Elizabeth Lowell Putnam Prize, awarded to the highest-scoring female each year.

Former Associate Dean for Residence and Campus Activities James R. Tewhey files a civil lawsuit against the Institute and several employees in Middlesex Superior Court. The suit is the latest response to a harassment case against Tewhey that prompted him to leave MIT in 1993.

12

Barbara J. Souter G is elected president of the Graduate Student Council on the platform of graduate housing and input into dean searches. Patrick S. Wojdowski G is elected vice president, and Randy D. Weinstein G and Gregory E. Penn G are voted secretary and treasurer, respectively.

16

Hanna H. Gray, president emeritus of the University of Chicago, is chosen this week as the the Commencement speaker for the ceremonies on June 9 ceremonies. Gray, a distinguished history scholar, is a former provost at Yale University and a former dean at Northwestern University.

20

The 10th annual Mr. Spring Weekend contest, sponsored by the Women's Independent Living Group, kicks off a series of Spring Weekend events that entertain students while winning local charities over $7,000.

21

The independent living group Epsilon Theta files a court complaint against the national fraternity Sigma Nu to defend the use of its name. For historical reasons, Returning to campus after a 20-year hiatus, Sigma Nu intends to name its recently chartered MIT chapter "Epsilon Theta of Sigma Nu." The group is also expecting to move into a new house near Kenmore Square this fall.

24

With his machine Alleluia, Hyoseok Yang '97 wins this year's Introduction to Design (2.70) contest. After two nights of competition in front of packed crowds in 26-100, Yang's machine captures the top spot in a field of about 160 machines. This year's contest is titled Pebble Beach after the famous California golf course.

27

Members of the MIT community observe Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, honoring the memories of the victims of the Holocaust with a memorial service, a remembrance exhibit, and a photographic montage. The commemorative activities were organized by students of the Jewish religious group Hillel.

May

2

Matthew H. Braun '93, a system programmer for the Distributed Computing and Network Services division of Information Systems, receives the Big Screw Award. The contest, sponsored by the MIT chapter of the Alpha Phi Omega national service fraternity, awards the most deserving faculty member with a 3-foot-long, left-hand threaded aluminum screw.

3

MIT holds the second re-engineering town meeting in Kresge Auditorium, a year-and-a-half after the first one. President Charles M. Vest and other senior administrators review the progress of the Institute's re-engineering effort and answer questions from employees in attendance.

After a divisive debate, the Undergraduate Association Council rejects a constitution that would have implemented changes across the entire organization and instead passes an amendment to the current constitution that reduces the size of the body by half.

The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence votes unanimously to recommend the confirmation of Institute Professor John M. Deutch '61 as Director of the CIA.

5

Several dormitories settle on faculty members to fill vacant Housemaster posts. Halston W. Taylor, head coach of the men's track and cross country teams, and his wife Cathy will leave Random Hall to be the new housemasters at Burton-Conner. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Munther A. Dahleh and his wife Jinane accept the post at MacGregor. Associate Professor of Literature Henry Jenkins and his wife Cynthia agree to become the housemasters of Senior House.

9

Nobel laureate Phillip A. Sharp, Head of the Department of Biology, is reported as a potential target of the Unabomber, the letter-bomber who has sent 16 mail bombs over the last 17 years. The Boston Globe reports that Richard J. Roberts of New England Biolabs, Inc., who shared a Nobel with Sharp, is also a potential target.

15

Dean for Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs Arthur C. Smith is honored at the 1995 Awards Convocation with the presentation of a new Institute award bearing his name.

30

Senior Week Activities begin. The activities, which run through Commencement, include a free party at Jillian Pool Hall, an event with comedians in Lobdell Court, and a Boston Harbor boat cruise, all of which are aimed at allowing seniors a chance to enjoy their last few weeks at MIT.

June

8

A House of Representatives subcommittee approves a plan to eliminate funding for MIT's Bates Linear Accelerator and four other nuclear physics particle accelerators next year.

Thomas D. Cabot, a life member emeritus and the longest serving member of the MITCorporation, dies at the age of 98.

George P. Panteleyev G, a graduate student in the MIT-Woods Hole Oceanographic Engineering, is lost overboard during a research trip on the Ob River in Siberia. He is presumed dead.

Dean of the School of Engineering Joel Moses PhD '67 is confirmed as the Institute's next provost by the Corporation Executive Committee. Moses succeeds Mark S. Wrighton, who steps down today to become chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis, Mo.

9

Killian Court hosts MIT's 129th Commencement exercises, bringing together 1,794 graduates and an estimated 8,000 relatives and guests. A total of 2,026 degrees, 961 undergraduate and 1,065 advanced, are awarded from the Institute's five schools and 21 academic departments.

12

Professor of Writing Rosalind H. Williams is named the joint new dean for undergraduate education and student affairs by President Charles M. Vest. Williams replaces current UESADean Arthur C. Smith, who will retire at the end of the summer after five years in the position.

20

The House Science Committee reverses a June 8 subcommittee vote and approves funding next year for MIT's Bates Linear Accelerator Center and four other nuclear physics particle accelerators around the country.

25

Kristen E. Finnegan G dies unexpectedly of a heart condition. Finnegan was a doctoral student studying the history, theory, and criticism of art and architecture.

29

The MIT Solar Electric Vehicle Team's car races to victory in Sunrayce '95, a 1,150-mile solar car race from Indiana to Colorado. The MIT car, named Manta for its flat, sleek shape, beat out 37 collegiate competitors from around North America in the nine-day race.

July

1

As part of its continuing money-saving effort, the Re-engineering Steering Committee closes the Office of Lab Supplies. Services offered by the OLS will be replaced by those offered by outside vendors. Community response ranges from indifference to outrage.

18

President Charles M. Vest warns in an address that proposed federal budget cuts could affect not only university education and research, but industry and the competitiveness of the United States.

August

14

Post-doctoral researcher Yuqing Li is contaminated with an estimated 579 microcuries of Phosphorous 32, just under the federal acceptable yearly one-time exposure limit of 600 microcuries. The Radiation Protection Office confiscates and takes inventory of the radioactive materials, but the Center for Cancer Research lab continues to operate as usual.

17

Professor Emeritus of Physics George Bekefi, who retired this summer after 38 years of teaching and research, dies after a battle with leukemia at the age of 70. Bekefi is best known for his accomplishments in the field of plasma physics, specifically in the production of high-powered microwave generators.

23

Issues of the MIT-Wellesley publication Counterpoint are stolen from the Infinite Corridor and Student center around midnight. Editor Han Y. Huang G suspects the culprit is "a disgruntled fraternity" that was not pleased by its description in the article "Wherever You May Roam: A Frank Guide to ILGs at MIT."

24

President Charles M. Vest, incoming Dean for Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs Rosalind H. Williams, and Undergraduate Association President Carrie R. Muh '96 welcome the freshmen to MIT at the annual freshman convocation. Professor of Biology Eric Lander delivers the keynote speech.

25

For the first time, a student, Catherine D. Conley '96, delivers the Killian Kick-Off keynote address. Conley, Dormitory Council President Dhaya Lakshminarayanan '96, and Chair of the Women's Conference Stephanie A. Sparvero '96 also address the class of 1999.

Because of a grading change, only 17 percent of the freshman taking the Freshman Essay Evaluation pass the test, down from 48 percent last year. The Writing Requirement Office decided to raise the passing grade on the exam.

27

The computerized housing lottery is delayed an hour, causing much frustration among freshmen who had flocked to the Athena clusters to enter their dormitory preferences.

29

Graduate student residence and orientation kicks off with events aimed at easing the 1,200 newcomers into MIT life. A Red Sox game and a cruise of Boston Harbor are among the main events of graduate R/O.

30

Students choose physical education and humanities distribution classes in separate Athena-based lotteries. Also, for the first time, a lottery is used to regulate enrollment in selected oversubscribed science and humanities classes.

A Ford minivan carrying two members of Tau Epsilon Phi collides with a Chrysler station wagon at the intersection of Amherst Street and Massachusetts Avenue. Neither the drivers nor the passengers are hurt.

September

1

The Coop announces that Barnes & Noble Bookstores will manage store operations for the Harvard Cooperative Society as part of major restructuring. The restructuring also aims to make the Kendall Square Coop the finest technical bookstore in the nation.

About 300 fourth through sixth grade Cambridge public school students descend on MIT for the fourth annual City Days festival. Over 800 MIT students, 75 percent of whom are freshmen, participate in the event.

Faculty, research staff, and graduate students from MIT and Harvard University gain free limited access to both universities' libraries, but undergraduates from MIT and Harvard are not included in the exchange borrowing agreement.

3

John N. Krikelis '97 dies when his motorcycle crashes into a telephone pole in Raynham, a town near Plymouth. Krikelis, 21, was not wearing a helmet. A native of Greece, Krikelis was a brother of Delta Upsilon.

6

Forty-five members of the Sigma Kappa sorority take residence in Ashdown House. The move is aimed at reducing undergraduate crowding, a high priority in the administration.

The Sloan School of Management's new 45,000-square-foot Tang Center, connected to Building E51, is scheduled to open this fall. Located at the corner of Amherst and Wadsworth Streets, the three-story center is set to include a 298-seat lecture hall, a lounge, a student activity suite, and a corporate resource center.

7

Campus Activities Complex and the Office of Residence and Campus Activities announce that the use of metal detectors will now be required for on-campus events that meet a set of criteria. The move was made in response to disruptions that occurred at some parties in the spring.

9

Winse Chan, 19, a Boston University sophomore, is hospitalized in critical condition after being struck and thrown 107 feet by a speeding car as she crossed Memorial Drive after leaving a Kappa Sigma party. The driver of the car, Kurnia Hermawan, also 19 and also a BU student, is cited for speeding and operating to endanger.

11

MIT's new cogeneration plant goes on-line after two and a half years of construction and upgrades. The new plant represents an effort by MIT to economize its power generation and transfer facilities. The $37 million construction cost will be paid for in six years, aided by savings from lower energy costs.

12

The Campus Police mid-year report finds that crime on campus increased slightly over the last year. There were more incident calls and arrests, and the serious crime rate rose a small amount for the first half of 1995.

15

The Kendall Square Cinema, located at One KendallSquare, opens today.

21

MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital are named as defendants in a lawsuit by relatives of brain tumor patients. The suit is filed on behalf of 140 patients who underwent experimental treatment administered at MIT's Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, MGH, and the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York in the 1960s. Ten patients died from complications associated with the treatment.

26

This week the Undergraduate Association announces the winners of the freshman elections, conducted on Athena for the first time. Most of the elections are close: Jin S. Kim '99 is elected class president by only two votes.

29

A $100,000 per month penalty is charged to MIT under a Department of Public Utilities ruling involving the new cogeneration plant. The fine will total about $4.5 million over the four years it will run. MIT announces its intention to dispute the fine.

October

1

The Institute is charged this month in a lawsuit over radiation experiments MIT conducted at a home for mentally retarded children during the 1950s. The charge comes only days after an advisory committee to President Clinton released findings about thousands of human radiation experiments conducted during the Cold War, including the tests done at the Fernald School.

Information Systems changes the Athena cluster entry code as part of a plan to strengthen security. The move comes in response to an increasing number of incidents involving cluster use by people not affiliated with MIT.

A Wellesley College student is assaulted by an unidentified female near McCormick Hall while waiting for the Wellesley bus early in the morning. The victim, whose name was not released, was uninjured.

The team charged with re-engineering student services begins work this month. Its goal is to find ways to increase the value and the quality of services while decreasing the temporal and monetary costs of those services.

2

Benjamin C. Bradlee, former executive editor of The Washington Post, reads from his memoirs, A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures. He also answers questions about more recent events, like the information superhighway and the Post's publication of the Unabomber's manifesto.

8

Garret M. Moose '91, who sustained severe injuries following a pole vaulting accident four years ago and was expelled by MIT after a computer theft incident in 1991, is awarded $600,000 in damages for his injuries from MIT by a Middlesex Superior Court jury this week.

10

The Media Laboratory celebrates its 10th anniversary with a day-long symposium on its research, new technology, and its perspectives on the digital future. The event also officially kicks off Things That Think, a new research consortium aimed at giving everyday objects from sneakers to frying pans the common sense to do useful things on their own.

11

Professor of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences Mario J. Molina shares the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work in atmospheric chemistry concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone. This is the first Nobel Prize ever awarded for the study of human beings' effect on the environment.

13

The Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, which include at least six people affiliated with MIT, shares the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize. Pugwash, an anti-nuclear group of scientists named after the town in Nova Scotia where the first conference was held, grew out of a manifesto drafted by Albert Einstein and British mathematician and philosopher Bertrand Russell.

15

The body of James Boyer of Mattapan is found lying between Buildings 12 and 13 in a dumpster. Boyer had no known connection to MIT.

Ann J. Wolpert, the executive director of library and information services at the Harvard Business School since 1993, is selected this week as the new director of Libraries. The decision comes after a recommendation by the Libraries Search Committee.

18

President Charles M. Vest appoints the ROTC task force to replace the ROTC working group, whose five-year term ends this month. Because ROTC discriminates against homosexuals, the Institute's policy on ROTC has been under review since a faculty resolution in 1990.

19

MIT makes a Supreme Judicial Court appeal against the $100,000-per-month fine that the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities levied against MIT for its cogeneration plant. Lawyers for the Institute charge in the appeal that the ruling violates a federal law protecting cogeneration plants, exceeds the authority of the DPU, and is hence unprecedented.

24

Professor Alan Brody, head of the humanities department's music and theater arts section, is named associate provost for the arts. Brody replaces Professor of Music Ellen T. Harris, who has held the post for six years, is stepping down to concentrate on writing a book about the classical composer Handel.

28

Vice President Al Gore speaks to the Society of Environmental Journalists at MIT. In his speech, he attacks the Republican Congress for its inaction on environmental issues and praises the journalists at the conference.

29

A deliberately blocked chimney fills parts of Random Hall with smoke and forces the evacuation of the dormitory for several hours. Random Hall residents are also without heat and hot water for the night.

November

3

Random Hall residents meet with housing officials to address the series of near-disasters the dormitory has recently experienced, like the Oct. 29 evacuation resulting from a blocked chimney. Other recent housing problems include sewer drain blockage and periodic lack of heat and hot water.

4

Cambridge firefighters and Campus Police are called in to evacuate Baker House after posters in a fifth-floor lounge are deliberately set on fire. "We are not sure who did it, but we have a pretty good idea that it was not a Baker resident," said Baker House President Catherine D. Conley '96.

8

Members of the MIT community gather for a memorial service to honor the slain prime minister of Israel, Yitzhak Rabin. The country's eighth prime minister was assassinated following a Nov. 4 peace rally by Yigal Amir, a right-wing Jewish law student, as a protest against Rabin's central role in the Middle Eastern peace process.

15

The faculty approves a new Master of Science program in System Design and Management. A joint program between the School of Engineering and the Sloan School of Management, the program entails a combination of technical knowledge with management in designing new system. It will start next fall.

20

Jane Goodall, the world-renowned primatologist, speaks about her work with chimpanzees.

28

The student services re-engineering team continues to meet with various administrative, faculty, and student groups to prepare a plan to reduce complexity, improve quality, and reduce costs of the Institute's services. The plan will be refined with community feedback in January and implemented in February.

December

1

Margaret R. Bates, an academic and financial planning officer at Harvard University and a former vice provost of Duke University, takes office as dean for student life. Dean for Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs Rosalind H. Williams, who appointed Bates, changes titles to become dean for undergraduate education.

3

Northeastern University student Clifton Whilby, 18, is shot by a fellow student on Memorial Drive outside Walker Memorial early this morning as an Alpha Phi Alpha party in Walker was ending. The incident prompts the Institute to cancel all large late-night parties until at least late spring for safety concerns.

15

Anya Pogosyants G, 26, and her husband Igor Slobodkin, 28, die in an automobile accident. An undergraduate research award has since been established in her name.

Compiled by Brett Altschul, Anders Hove, Jean K. Lee and Ifung Lu