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Men's Soccer Ties Game against Union

By Thomas Kettler
Staff Reporter

In a game that demonstrated the Engineers' continued problems with scoring goals, the MIT men's soccer team tied the Union College Dutchmen 11 Saturday at Steinbrenner Stadium. The nonconference game brought the team to 231 overall record without affecting their 12 record in the Constitution Athletic Conference.

In the first half the Engineers relied heavily upon goalkeeper Raja Jindal '95 as the ball rarely left MIT's side of the field. During the half Union had 8 shots on goal to MIT's 3.

With 20 minutes left in the half, the Engineers caught a break as an apparent Union goal was disallowed. Jindal saved the ball but it appeared that the Dutchmen kicked the ball for a goal on the rebound. However, the officials ruled that Jindal's save hit the crossbar, and a corner kick was ruled on which Union couldn't capitalize. Defenseman Paul Mashikian '95 received a yellow card on a hard tackle with 12 minutes, 35 seconds left in the period.

The second half continued similar to the first. However, with 20 minutes left to play, midfielder Alan Love '95 and forward Robert Frederick '95 received yellow cards on called hard tackles in a span of 34 seconds. A few minutes later, with 13:48 left in the game, the first goal was scored when Union's Jeremy Liebhoff kicked the ball into MIT's open net after an assist by Vincent Obermeier.

One minute later Obermeier kicked the ball into his own goal attempting to clear it, giving MIT their first, and only point. F Samuel Pearlman '96 received credit for that goal since he was the last Engineer to touch the ball.

MIT played a more intense offense in the second half, with 8 shots on goal Overall, MIT played more intensely on offense in the second half than in the first, taking 8 shots to Union's 6.

The two 15 minute periods of overtime were uneventful. The Engineer's superior depth was demonstrated by their ability to consistently outrun the tired Dutchmen defenders. Still no MIT player could complete a scoring opportunity. The Engineers didn't help themselves by often trying to take the ball through some double and triple teams.

MIT has scored only 12 goals in all six games this season, with 9 of them against the Nichols College Bisons two weeks ago.

"I think it's typical of the way the season has been going," said Coach Walter Alessi. "Everyone plays hard, works hard during the game and yet on our scoring opportunities, we can't put the ball in the goal with any regularity." He said, "I think it can be equated to a baseball slump."