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Five Win Compton Prizes

By Daniel C. Stevenson
Associate News Editor

David S. Cuthbert G, Kristala L. Jones '94, Anand Mehta G, Mark Y. D. Wang G, and The Tech received Karl Taylor Compton Prizes at the 1994 Awards Convocation Wednesday afternoon. According to the program, the Compton Prizes are presented "in recognition of outstanding contributions in promoting high standards of achievement and good citizenship within the MIT community."

The awarding of the Compton Prizes culminated a two-hour ceremony at which 51 students, faculty, staff, and organizations received awards for academic, artistic, and athletic excellence and community service.

Professor Robert L. Jaffe, chair of the Faculty, presided at the ceremony. Dean for Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs Arthur C. Smith presented the Compton Prizes.

"Your resume reads like an [Residence and Orientation Week] pamphlet of MIT activities and organizations," Smith said to Jones when presenting the award. Smith cited Jones' involvement in the Independent Activities Policy Committee, the Black Students' Union, the National Society of Black Engineers, and the Committee on Academic Performance.

Mehta was recognized for his work with the Graduate Student Council. He has served as GSC president, chair of the GSC subcommittee Peer Advocates Against Harassment, and taught an IAP course entitled "A Crash Course in C."

Wang, a former graduate resident tutor at Baker House, was awarded for contributions to the Department of Physics and to the residents of Baker. Wang was the first editor of the GRT newsletter True Grit, and he helped create the Baker Life student guide. Wang also worked with the MIT Medical Department on the development of several health-related programs.

Cuthbert received recognition for his work in the development of a new schedule for A Safe Ride. He coordinated the GSC grocery shuttle and was GSC vice president. Cuthbert also helped with the Safe Walk program.

The Tech received a special Compton Prize for its "significant and unique contribution to the MIT community," Smith said.