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United States has beccome greatest threat to peace

Along with US atrocities in Iraq and Kuwait, and the grossly illegal actions in Panama, current reports of a Bay-of-Pigs style fiasco in Libya underscores the fact that the United States has become the greatest threat to world peace.

The message is clear: Any nationalistic world leader who does not want to join the Washington puppet show will be targeted for removal -- by any means possible.

Based on non-existent "proof" of Libya's connection with terrorist activities, a bombing raid

was conducted to kill Quaddafi. When the attempt failed, a group of dissidents were trained to overthrow him.

This has also succeeded in failing, with the United States spending enormous amounts of money to relocate these dissident commandos. It seems to me very hypocritical that this country should be so scared of purported domestic terrorist activities when it engages in them itself with no remorse.

The American government acts as if the world is a chess board. Foreign leaders are pawns to be manipulated for its own self-interests, and the rights and dignities of other peoples are blatantly ignored and trampled upon.

In the name of empty words such as "freedom" and "democracy," dictatorial regimes are supported, and the United Nations is considered a toy. When the United Nations condemned the US invasion of Panama, Bush cared less, but now with the Persian Gulf situation, to avoid an overtly imperialistic image, Bush regards the UN as a sacred institution to drum up world support.

The worse aspects of American foreign policy that make it even more dangerous to the world are its nearsightedness and discontinuity. American leaders lack the capabilities and intelligence for strategic planning. They also completely lack any moral scruples.

If a foreign leader is anti-American he must be removed -- now. No consideration is given to the future stability of the region and long-term effects.

For example, in Panama, after the kidnapping of Manuel Noriega and the installment of a new president (who had to be sworn in on a US base) the United States promised over $400 million in aid. So far a mere $30 million has been given, and with growing economic troubles a recent poll indicated that the new Panamanian president has a mere 20 percent of the people's support.

The sole objective of the Panama adventure was to remove somebody the United States didn't like -- the well-being

of the Panamanians was never considered.

The other problem, discontinuity, is intrinsic in the American government. Each administration has its own world view. Allies during one administration may be considered enemies during another -- and you know what happens to enemies.

Robie Samanta Roy G->