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KAT, Dpi call first rush successful

By Chris Schechter

Two new independent living groups, Kappa Alpha Theta and Delta Pi, recently completed their first year of rush activities at MIT.

Both called their rushes successful, with DPi extending three bids to freshmen and KAT's national organization, known as the Grand Council, recruiting 56 members from all classes.

DPi President Lawrence P. Lubowsky '92 said that his fraternity, whose 34 members are former brothers of Alpha Epsilon Pi, gave out most of their bids a week ago. He said that their rush activities included several barbecues and a booth in Lobby 10. Expenses for the activities were paid by local fraternities, he added.

Lubowsky remained confident that more freshmen will be invited to join this year. None of the invited freshman have committed themselves to pledge yet, he added.

DPi's lack of a house means that its members are spread throughout the dormitory system. Lubowsky admitted that "our fraternity is going through hard times," but added that "Delta Pi will be here next year."

DPi was formed after the MIT chapter of AEPi was reorganized by its national organization last spring. The national claimed that the chapter violated its group insurance policy guidelines, and ousted all but 10 of the members.

Some of these members went on to form DPi, which has no national organization. DPi was given membership in the Interfraternity Council soon after its formation.

AEPi was restarted several weeks later with six new founding fathers, including one senior who remained from the old chapter. Members are currently housed in dormitories, but the national organization has apparently promised them use of the chapter's house on Bay State Rd. starting next year.

While AEPi would not release rush figures, sources close to the group said they have pledged five freshmen. The group is no longer a member of the IFC, but has joined the Association of Student Activities.

Fourth sorority

on campus

KAT, the newest sorority on campus, rushed during the third week of the term. The Grand Council sent some alumni to select new members, with a goal of pledging about 60 sisters.

To recruit members, the sorority set up an information booth during rush week, followed by an informal party and interviews a few weeks later. This process will be repeated in the spring, when KAT will rush again in order to invite more sophomores and freshmen.

According to KAT Chapter Consultant Sara Spellman, the colonization of MIT was a great success. She did not feel the new sorority was put at a disadvantage by its delayed rush. "A lot of women waited for Theta" and are now "meeting the challenge of creating a sorority very well," Spellman said.

Although the initial rush was at the council's expense, the chapter is now on its own, drawing funds from fall dues. Theresa L. Fuentes '91, president of KAT, is confident that next fall her sorority will rush as an equal to the other sororities on campus.