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Support Bapna and Schwingel

Support Bapna

and Schwingel

Undergraduate Association elections provide an opportunity to examine the proper function of student government. The promises of candidates running for president and vice president raise questions about how much the UA can influence events at MIT and on what issues the UA leadership should focus. The three teams vying in this year's elections have each articulated different ideas about the role of the UA and it is on these ideas that voters should judge them.

Thomas S. Kang '91 and Jon D. Strizzi '92 have promised an ambitious agenda for student government next year. They say that they will make extensive organizational revisions in the UA, assign each UA officer a separate budget to fund initiatives, increase visibility through a biweekly publication and publicity chairman, explore permanent fund raising schemes, push for a curriculum reform that reflects the diverse academic interests, work to equalize the male/female ratio on campus, fight sexual harassment, and on and on. The Kang/Strizzi platform is so ambitious that it leads one to question whether it is at all realistic and whether the two candidates understand the nature of the jobs they seek. Neither Kang nor Strizzi has had much experience with student government and it seems very likely that, if elected, they will find themselves overwhelmed, unable to carry out their promises.

Also, Strizzi's role in designing an Alpha Tau Omega T-shirt that seemed to encourage rape undercuts the team's pledge to implement an undergraduate initiative on "diversity and mutual respect."

Like Kang and Strizzi, David W. Hogg '92 and David M. Stern '91 foresee an ambitious role for the UA. And like Kang and Strizzi, Hogg and Stern will likely fail to implement their ideas if elected. They promise to "demand" a student voice on the future of ARA, to "fight" any proposal on freshman housing or Residence/Orientation Week that is not drafted and approved by the student body, to "demand" that students be included in the final selection of MIT's president, to "fight" to end restrictive alcohol and party policies, and to "demand" a firm policy on those who engage in sexual harassment. While all this demanding and fighting does convey a strong sense of purpose, it does not indicate that Hogg and Stern have a realistic conception of the power of student government to effect change at MIT or even to galvanize student opinion. The UA has little direct influence on policy decisions, and most students have been reluctant to let the UA or any other single organization take the lead on campus issues. Hogg and Stern have offered no evidence that they are capable of changing the situation.

The third team running for UA president and vice president, Manish Bapna '91 and Colleen M. Schwingel '92, have billed themselves as the "realistic" choice -- and that is what they are. They have proposed a UA agenda for next year that would be beneficial to the student body and that indicates they have a serious understanding of the limits and possibilities of UA leadership. Bapna and Schwingel pledge to build a rapport with the next MIT president and provost so as to be able to convey student opinions effectively, to discourage calendar changes students do not favor, to lobby for longer dinner hours and hot breakfasts in the dining halls, to encourage faculty/student interaction through social events and discussions, and to provide student services like airport shuttles. The Bapna/Schwingel platform addresses issues about which students care and on which student government can have a real impact. Moreover, both candidates' have substantial experience in student government -- Bapna is a member of the UA Finance Board and junior class treasurer, while Schwingel is the UA's current secretary general.

More than the other two teams, Bapna and Schwingel have produced evidence that they will be effective as UA leaders and will be able to carry through on their promises. Bapna and Schwingel deserve the support of voters in tomorrow's elections for president and vice president of the Undergraduate Association.

By David Rothstein

The indoor track and field team took second place in the NCAA Division III Championships, held at Smith College in Northampton, MA, last Friday and Saturday. But for a nightmarish run of bad luck, which included two places lost by one centimeter each, a dropped baton, and even a van that broke down, the Engineers may have brought home the championship crown.

MIT scored 301/2 points, finishing behind Lincoln University (36 points), and was 11/2 points ahead of third-place University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse. MIT likely had the best team in the championships, but the Engineers' ill fortune was Lincoln's gain.

MIT gained a national champion in the 400 meters on the strength of senior Boniface Makatiani's 48.46 showing. The team's finish matched the best-ever showing in an NCAA championship by MIT (the women's volleyball team finished second in the nation in 1985). Nonetheless, Friday will undoubtedly remain a day of disbelief for the seven members of MIT's contingent and its two coaches.

In the morning pole vault competition, team co-captain Bill Singhose '90 went 15 feet, 3 inches without a miss. That performance was worth second in last year's championships, but only earned him only a tie for sixth place this year.

Then there was the 35-pound weight throw. John-Paul Clarke '91 and Eric Shank '91 threw well and placed second and third, with throws of 16.81 meters (55'-2") and 16.62 m (54'-61/2"), respectively. But St. Thomas' Ben Bautch threw 16.82 m (55'-21/4"), one short centimeter farther than Clarke.

Dents in the weight itself are bigger than that.

Next up on the list of close calls ... the long jump, Friday afternoon.

Singhose was seeded 11th of 12 competitors, but as usual, did better than expected, jumping to a 7.01 m (23'-0") fifth place. UW-Lacrosse's Jeremy Martens, however, on his last jump went one centimeter better, to take fourth at 7.02 m (23'-1/2").

The bad luck continued as sophomore Mike Piepergerdes ran a strong 3:55.82 in his 1500-meter trial, but missed making the final by .06 seconds.

Without a doubt the team's greatest frustration came at the end of a long Friday of competition, in the 1600-meter relay trials.

The Engineers' team, which was undefeated during the regular season, and had to its credit an MIT record as well as wins in the Greater Boston and New England Division III Championships, was seeded second at the national meet. Running against the not-so-speedy competition of State University of New York-Albany, University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire, and Westfield State, MIT was well on its way to qualifying for the final, to be held on Saturday.

But the team's anchor runner, Makatiani, dropped the baton. Not knowing that he could pick the baton up and continue running, Makatiani slowed down before the unbelieving eyes of teammates Kevin Scannell '92, Singhose and Mark Dunzo '91.

Makatiani made no excuses last night.

"I feel terrible," he said in a telephone interview. "It cost us the meet.

"In the motion of trading [the baton] from one hand to the other and accelerating, the baton fell out."

Makatiani said that he did not realize until the other runners were 200 meters past him that he could pick up the baton and continue, and by that time it was far too late.

Makatiani came back Saturday with a strong win in the 400 meters, leading from start to finish. In doing so, he set a personal best time for an indoor run on a flat track, and shed memories of a sixth-place finish in last year's outdoor championships.

MIT's other points came on Dunzo's fourth-place finish in the same race, in a personal best 49.20. Dunzo finished a tantalizing .01 seconds behind Lincoln's Clive Terrelonge.

Saturday afternoon, Lincoln won the 1600-meter relay in 3:17.82. MIT would have had to place only third in that race to win the championship.

That thought may unfortunately overshadow MIT's great accomplishment in taking second place in the championship, which Singhose described as "higher than MIT ever thought of placing before."

Singhose said that the disappointment came in not reaching the team's high expectations.

"We'll have a chance to prove [ourselves] when it comes to outdoor track," Makatiani said. So [cl9.5]

the narrow loss may serve as a motivating factor in the outdoor championships, which will be even harder to win.

"If we were going to have a problem of motivation," said Singhose with a laugh, "we don't have one anymore."

For Dunzo, losing the chance for first was "heartwrenching."

"It hurts so much just to give it away," he said, acknowledging that in light of the team's potential for a championship title, taking second was disappointing.

"Two centimeters and one one-hundredth of a second," he noted wryly, "and we are national champions.

"But outdoors...," he trailed off. "Live and learn..."

Oh yes, the van. The team went out for lunch Friday, but got stuck at the sandwich shop when the van broke down. Singhose had to take a cab to return to Smith for the long jump.

Just goes to show that there is no such thing as a sure thing.

By David Rothstein

The indoor track and field team took second place in the NCAA Division III Championships, held at Smith College in Northampton, MA, last Friday and Saturday. But for a nightmarish run of bad luck, which included two places lost by one centimeter each, a dropped baton, and even a van that broke down, the Engineers may have brought home the championship crown.

MIT scored 301/2 points, finishing behind Lincoln University (36 points), and was 11/2 points ahead of third-place University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse. MIT likely had the best team in the championships, but the Engineers' ill fortune was Lincoln's gain.

MIT gained a national champion in the 400 meters on the strength of senior Boniface Makatiani's 48.46 showing. The team's finish matched the best-ever showing in an NCAA championship by MIT (the women's volleyball team finished second in the nation in 1985). Nonetheless, Friday will undoubtedly remain a day of disbelief for the seven members of MIT's contingent and its two coaches.

In the morning pole vault competition, team co-captain Bill Singhose '90 went 15 feet, 3 inches without a miss. That performance was worth second in last year's championships, but only earned him only a tie for sixth place this year.

Then there was the 35-pound weight throw. John-Paul Clarke '91 and Eric Shank '91 threw well and placed second and third, with throws of 16.81 meters (55'-2") and 16.62 m (54'-61/2"), respectively. But St. Thomas' Ben Bautch threw 16.82 m (55'-21/4"), one short centimeter farther than Clarke.

Dents in the weight itself are bigger than that.

Next up on the list of close calls ... the long jump, Friday afternoon.

Singhose was seeded 11th of 12 competitors, but as usual, did better than expected, jumping to a 7.01 m (23'-0") fifth place. UW-Lacrosse's Jeremy Martens, however, on his last jump went one centimeter better, to take fourth at 7.02 m (23'-1/2").

The bad luck continued as sophomore Mike Piepergerdes ran a strong 3:55.82 in his 1500-meter trial, but missed making the final by .06 seconds.

Without a doubt the team's greatest frustration came at the end of a long Friday of competition, in the 1600-meter relay trials.

The Engineers' team, which was undefeated during the regular season, and had to its credit an MIT record as well as wins in the Greater Boston and New England Division III Championships, was seeded second at the national meet. Running against the not-so-speedy competition of State University of New York-Albany, University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire, and Westfield State, MIT was well on its way to qualifying for the final, to be held on Saturday.

But the team's anchor runner, Makatiani, dropped the baton. Not knowing that he could pick the baton up and continue running, Makatiani slowed down before the unbelieving eyes of teammates Kevin Scannell '92, Singhose and Mark Dunzo '91.

Makatiani made no excuses last night.

"I feel terrible," he said in a telephone interview. "It cost us the meet.

"In the motion of trading [the baton] from one hand to the other and accelerating, the baton fell out."

Makatiani said that he did not realize until the other runners were 200 meters past him that he could pick up the baton and continue, and by that time it was far too late.

Makatiani came back Saturday with a strong win in the 400 meters, leading from start to finish. In doing so, he set a personal best time for an indoor run on a flat track, and shed memories of a sixth-place finish in last year's outdoor championships.

MIT's other points came on Dunzo's fourth-place finish in the same race, in a personal best 49.20. Dunzo finished a tantalizing .01 seconds behind Lincoln's Clive Terrelonge.

Saturday afternoon, Lincoln won the 1600-meter relay in 3:17.82. MIT would have had to place only third in that race to win the championship.

That thought may unfortunately overshadow MIT's great accomplishment in taking second place in the championship, which Singhose described as "higher than MIT ever thought of placing before."

Singhose said that the disappointment came in not reaching the team's high expectations.

"We'll have a chance to prove [ourselves] when it comes to outdoor track," Makatiani said. So [cl9.5]

the narrow loss may serve as a motivating factor in the outdoor championships, which will be even harder to win.

"If we were going to have a problem of motivation," said Singhose with a laugh, "we don't have one anymore."

For Dunzo, losing the chance for first was "heartwrenching."

"It hurts so much just to give it away," he said, acknowledging that in light of the team's potential for a championship title, taking second was disappointing.

"Two centimeters and one one-hundredth of a second," he noted wryly, "and we are national champions.

"But outdoors...," he trailed off. "Live and learn..."

Oh yes, the van. The team went out for lunch Friday, but got stuck at the sandwich shop when the van broke down. Singhose had to take a cab to return to Smith for the long jump.

Just goes to show that there is no such thing as a sure thing.

By David Rothstein

The indoor track and field team took second place in the NCAA Division III Championships, held at Smith College in Northampton, MA, last Friday and Saturday. But for a nightmarish run of bad luck, which included two places lost by one centimeter each, a dropped baton, and even a van that broke down, the Engineers may have brought home the championship crown.

MIT scored 301/2 points, finishing behind Lincoln University (36 points), and was 11/2 points ahead of third-place University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse. MIT likely had the best team in the championships, but the Engineers' ill fortune was Lincoln's gain.

MIT gained a national champion in the 400 meters on the strength of senior Boniface Makatiani's 48.46 showing. The team's finish matched the best-ever showing in an NCAA championship by MIT (the women's volleyball team finished second in the nation in 1985). Nonetheless, Friday will undoubtedly remain a day of disbelief for the seven members of MIT's contingent and its two coaches.

In the morning pole vault competition, team co-captain Bill Singhose '90 went 15 feet, 3 inches without a miss. That performance was worth second in last year's championships, but only earned him only a tie for sixth place this year.

Then there was the 35-pound weight throw. John-Paul Clarke '91 and Eric Shank '91 threw well and placed second and third, with throws of 16.81 meters (55'-2") and 16.62 m (54'-61/2"), respectively. But St. Thomas' Ben Bautch threw 16.82 m (55'-21/4"), one short centimeter farther than Clarke.

Dents in the weight itself are bigger than that.

Next up on the list of close calls ... the long jump, Friday afternoon.

Singhose was seeded 11th of 12 competitors, but as usual, did better than expected, jumping to a 7.01 m (23'-0") fifth place. UW-Lacrosse's Jeremy Martens, however, on his last jump went one centimeter better, to take fourth at 7.02 m (23'-1/2").

The bad luck continued as sophomore Mike Piepergerdes ran a strong 3:55.82 in his 1500-meter trial, but missed making the final by .06 seconds.

Without a doubt the team's greatest frustration came at the end of a long Friday of competition, in the 1600-meter relay trials.

The Engineers' team, which was undefeated during the regular season, and had to its credit an MIT record as well as wins in the Greater Boston and New England Division III Championships, was seeded second at the national meet. Running against the not-so-speedy competition of State University of New York-Albany, University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire, and Westfield State, MIT was well on its way to qualifying for the final, to be held on Saturday.

But the team's anchor runner, Makatiani, dropped the baton. Not knowing that he could pick the baton up and continue running, Makatiani slowed down before the unbelieving eyes of teammates Kevin Scannell '92, Singhose and Mark Dunzo '91.

Makatiani made no excuses last night.

"I feel terrible," he said in a telephone interview. "It cost us the meet.

"In the motion of trading [the baton] from one hand to the other and accelerating, the baton fell out."

Makatiani said that he did not realize until the other runners were 200 meters past him that he could pick up the baton and continue, and by that time it was far too late.

Makatiani came back Saturday with a strong win in the 400 meters, leading from start to finish. In doing so, he set a personal best time for an indoor run on a flat track, and shed memories of a sixth-place finish in last year's outdoor championships.

MIT's other points came on Dunzo's fourth-place finish in the same race, in a personal best 49.20. Dunzo finished a tantalizing .01 seconds behind Lincoln's Clive Terrelonge.

Saturday afternoon, Lincoln won the 1600-meter relay in 3:17.82. MIT would have had to place only third in that race to win the championship.

That thought may unfortunately overshadow MIT's great accomplishment in taking second place in the championship, which Singhose described as "higher than MIT ever thought of placing before."

Singhose said that the disappointment came in not reaching the team's high expectations.

"We'll have a chance to prove [ourselves] when it comes to outdoor track," Makatiani said. So [cl9.5]

the narrow loss may serve as a motivating factor in the outdoor championships, which will be even harder to win.

"If we were going to have a problem of motivation," said Singhose with a laugh, "we don't have one anymore."

For Dunzo, losing the chance for first was "heartwrenching."

"It hurts so much just to give it away," he said, acknowledging that in light of the team's potential for a championship title, taking second was disappointing.

"Two centimeters and one one-hundredth of a second," he noted wryly, "and we are national champions.

"But outdoors...," he trailed off. "Live and learn..."

Oh yes, the van. The team went out for lunch Friday, but got stuck at the sandwich shop when the van broke down. Singhose had to take a cab to return to Smith for the long jump.

Just goes to show that there is no such thing as a sure thing.