The Tech - Online EditionMIT's oldest and largest
newspaper & the first
newspaper published
on the web
Last Published: April 14, 2016
Boston Weather: 35.0°F | A Few Clouds

Articles by Sudeep Agarwala

STAFF WRITER
January 27, 2010
Jeremy Denk? Accompanist? Before you scoff:
STAFF WRITER
December 8, 2009
Twentieth century music is generally associated with atonality and avant-garde experimentation; this is not necessarily an untrue association, and many of Friday evening’s composers are specially known for their forays into these movements. The music is not without its own narrative, its own tonal lexicon and rationale that somehow culminates in a cohesive thesis. All of Friday evening’s music was older than fifty years old, and it was striking to hear how much of this music has been adapted in to the collective idiom in the twenty-first century.
STAFF WRITER
December 4, 2009
Far more than being in love, falling out of love seems to be a popular topic of music. Various iterations of the break-up song have been written for nearly two thousand years and set to music for a far shorter time, never more cleverly and expressively than the Italian masters nearly five hundred years ago. The MIT Chamber Chorus provided a glimpse into the panoply of techniques and expositions of these musicians.
STAFF WRITER
December 4, 2009
Of the fifteen books of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, the story of Acis and Galatea occupies less than two hundred lines of a single book: the mortal Acis and the nymph Galatea are in love, but the cyclops Polyphemus (yes, that Polyphemus, the one from the Odyssey; he, like most everything else, also has a back-story) is in love with Galatea too. As these things go, Galatea rebukes him and Polyphemus, understandably upset, expresses his rage in the only way he knows how: he crushes Acis with a boulder. Ovid completes the metamorphic tale on a light note, where Galatea, in her grief, immortalizes her lover by turning him into a river. The story, the plot all imitate dozens of others in the work, enough so that it seems like this one was another in a series of filler material Ovid had prepared to pad his tome.
STAFF WRITER
November 20, 2009
The Boston Choral Ensemble prepares for its 2009–2010 season featuring Thomas Jennefelt’s Villarosa Sequences on Friday, November 20 at First Church in Cambridge and Sunday, November 22 at Old South Church in Boston. The Tech interviewed conductor Miguel Felipe about the upcoming program. More information about this performance and the Boston Choral Ensemble can be found at http://www.bostonchoral.org/
STAFF WRITER
November 6, 2009
Boston choral ensemble Cantata Singers is preparing for its 2009–2010 season featuring works by Heinrich Schuetz, J.S. Bach, Hugo Distler and Arnold Schoenberg opening on Friday, November 6 at Jordan Hall. The Tech interviewed conductor David Hoose about the upcoming program and season. More information about this performance and the Cantata Singers Ensemble can be found at http://cantatasingers.org/
STAFF WRITER
November 6, 2009
I’m biased, of course: Despite being part of the Western canon, the music of the Renaissance somehow remains consistently foreign. It’s all there, the underpinnings that still guide sophisticated music even today — ideas on meter, or rhythm, rules guiding the structure of melodic lines, conceptions of how voices should interact with one another all exist in this fifteenth-century world, but somehow, to hear it is mysterious. Whereas concepts of thematic development, tonal resolution or structure seem to be at the center of the majority of works of the Western canon, the engine at the center of music from the Renaissance is somehow more elusive.
STAFF WRITER
October 27, 2009
For all of its expert craft, there are many non-trivial reasons Gioachino Rossini’s Tancredi isn’t one of his more popular operas. Large rifts gape in the plot line (Since when is Amenaide pregnant? Why doesn’t Argirio recognize the renown Tancredi when he joins his army? Why does Amenaide write a letter that is unaddressed and almost purposefully misleading?), while the drama portrays an affected and protracted moral code that holds very little in common with modern experience.
STAFF WRITER
October 16, 2009
A point of clarification: the practice of castrating pre-pubescent boys that showed promise in singing started in the sixteenth century somewhere in Italy. In the absence of the testosterone-secreting gland, limbs elongated, ribs kept growing (resulting in extraordinarily large lung capacity) and, perhaps most importantly, the larynx failed to develop: the adult male (castrato in Italian) retained his pre-pubescent range and flexibility. Subsequent training developed the pre-pubescent voice into a mature, fully-developed, yet eerily pristine, alto or soprano voice part.
STAFF WRITER
September 25, 2009
Of the three sets of keyboard pieces J.S. Bach published between 1715 and 1730, the Partitas are, by far, the weirdest.
<< First   1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5   Last >>