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Last Published: April 14, 2016
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Articles by Michael S. Schmidt

THE NEW YORK TIMES
September 16, 2014
WASHINGTON — Militants for the Islamic State have traveled to Mexico and are just miles from the United States. They plan to cross over the porous border and will “imminently” launch car bomb attacks. And the threat is so real that federal law enforcement officers have been placed at a heightened state of alert, and an American military base near the border has increased its security.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
April 11, 2014
WASHINGTON — Federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies “generally shared information and followed procedures appropriately” in their investigation of Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his brother, Dzhokhar, in the years leading up to the Boston Marathon bombing, but they should have more closely scrutinized Tamerlan when he returned to the United States from Dagestan in 2012, according to a report by the inspector general for the intelligence community that was released Thursday.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
September 20, 2013
WASHINGTON — The director of the FBI, James B. Comey, provided Thursday the most up-to-date account of the gunman’s rampage at the Washington Navy Yard, saying that he was “hunting people to shoot” as he made his way through the building but did not appear to have targeted a particular person or group of people.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
May 4, 2012
WASHINGTON — A study commissioned by President Barack Obama to assess the nation’s ability to respond to terrorist attacks and man-made and natural disasters has found that state and local officials have the most confidence in their public health and medical services but are the most concerned about whether agencies can respond to cyberattacks.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
August 3, 2011
BAGHDAD — Iraqis still live in a nation where bombings are a nearly daily occurrence, government paralysis is routine and corruption is de rigueur.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
May 8, 2009
When Major League Baseball officials examined the results of urine tests from the slugger Manny Ramirez earlier this season, they became suspicious. While the tests did not show clear evidence of a performance-enhancing drug, there were traces of banned substances present, enough to initiate a process that has now left one of the best hitters in baseball history with a 50-game suspension.
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