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Last Published: April 14, 2016
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Articles by Fangfei Shen

November 8, 2011
I may not remember as much as I would like from 3.091 (Introduction to Solid-State Chemistry), but I do remember the big, red “J”. And no, J here does not stand for joule.
April 12, 2011
When I first came to MIT about four years ago, I got the bright idea that I would live on free food as much as possible. I attended info sessions and club meetings, and I kept my eyes peeled for free food emails and free food lying around.
April 8, 2011
It’s kind of a thing at MIT to dye your hair unusual colors. Okay, I clarify: the colors are unusual by outside world standards, but not by MIT standards. Many people at the Institute have their hair dyed in an interesting assortment of colors, including hot pink, fire-truck red, construction-sign orange, Lady Gaga yellow, neon green, bright blue, deep purple, and ultraviolet (kidding about this one … I think) — it’s enough to make a rainbow, maybe even a double rainbow.
April 9, 2010
Have you experienced cryogenic tricks and treats at MIT? Well, it’s not too late if you haven’t. There are activities starring cryogenics throughout CPW, and they all use liquid nitrogen as their cryogen of choice. The reason is simple: Liquid nitrogen is cheap thanks to its atmospheric abundance (in fact, liquid nitrogen is cheaper than car gas!). While other cryogenic liquids would do similar tricks, they are made from rarer gases and are correspondingly pricier.
August 5, 2009
Earlier this summer, in the name of physics research, I was away in the distant lands of Cornell University. It’s a place that harbors more grass, flowers, trees, and cows than MIT can ever hope to accommodate. However, the natural beauty of Cornell’s campus was not enough to mask a certain flaw in its design: There was no Cornellian analogue to our Infinite Corridor. With few indoor routes to take to work, the weather became a lot easier to notice—and experience.
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